Debugging AppSense Environment Manager Logon Performance

More often then not, AppSense Environment Manager (EM) is blamed for poor logon performance. But with such limited logging, how can you tell if there is any merit to this accusation? Luckily, AppSense includes an application for creating and managing EM logs. Before you can analyze any logs, you must first install EM Tools which can be found in the DesktopNow installation media:

<root>\Software\Products\EnvironmentManagerTools32[64].msi.

Once installed, AppSense EM Debug Setup Tool must be configured.

AppSenseEMDebugTool

AppSense Environment Manager Debug Setup Tool must be configured before any logs are generated.

Once you have clicked the monitor icon to enable logging, then specified a path for the logs and enabled any settings you require, click ‘OK’.  You will be prompted that the User Virtualization service will be restarted, so click ‘Yes’. Here are some considerations when enabling debug logging:

  • The slider for Log Detail is defaulted to ’10’, which means the logs will be extremely verbose. Depending upon the level of detail required, ’10’ may not be necessary.
  • If you did not change the detail level, expect these logs to grow quite big – particularly if the endpoint is a shared hosted server with multiple tenants.
  • In the case of pooled or streamed endpoints, a local path will result in the write cache/differencing disk as the location for the logs and, thus, the logs will not persist between reboots.
  • In the case of pooled or streamed endpoints, consider using a network path for the logs. If logging is not required, make sure to disable logging on the master image prior to deploying it into production.
  • If the endpoint is a virtual desktop with PvD, the logs will be committed to the personal vDisk application VHD and, by nature of the PvD, will persist. Depending upon the level of detail selected, this may be a nightmare to manage.

EmUser.exe

The EM logon process is handled by EmUser.exe, so when analyzing EM logon performance you must use the log created with that name. At first, you may notice multiple logs formatted EmUser-x64_Session-2_Pid-nnnn, where nnnn is the session Process ID. Once you have determined which EmUser log is relevant to your debugging, make a copy of it for analyzing (But don’t open it – the format will probably make very little sense).

EM Debug Log Parser

The best tool to review this log is not included in the installation of EM Tools, however it can be downloaded from AppSense Exchange. If you do not have an account with that site yet, do it now! After downloading and opening EM Log Parser, drag the copy of the EmUser log into the EM Log Parser window. Depending upon the size of the EmUser log, the total duration of importing and formatting will vary.

I find EM Debug Log Parser a great way to show when AppSense is not the reason for poor logon performance.

Once the import is complete, click View > Timeline View. Right away, you can see which conditions/actions/triggers are responsible for causing performance issues. Moreover, I find it a great way to show when AppSense is not the reason for poor logon performance. In any case, the documentation included with the download provides great detail on how to use EM Log Parser.

Duration of each step, and the entirety of the logon process, is easily represented in the Timeline View.

Duration of each step, and the entirety of the logon process, is easily represented in the Timeline View.

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